Self + Data + Visual Narrative

The ‘Quantified Self’ is a movement seeking self-knowledge through self-tracking, often with the incorporation of technology to acquire data on aspects of a person's daily life, including consumption, performance, mood, etc.

Narrative is the form/structure of the story, not the content.

Narrative is a chain of events in cause-effect relationship occurring in time and space.
 

What makes a good data visualization? What makes a good story? 
Structure, flow, movement through time and space, a good title, clear hierarchy, simplicity?
Narrative Notes


Bordwell and Thompson define four non-narrative forms in their book, Film Art:

Categorical: where a subject is divided into parts or categories

Rhetorical: where an argument is presented and evidence is shown to support it

Abstract: where the reader’s attention is drawn to shape, color, rhythm and other visual forms

Associational: where an attitude is expressed or a mood evoked through juxtaposition or loose connections, suggesting an emotion or concept.

Nicholas Felton's Quantified Life

Felton's Site and Annual Reports

 Annotated diagram measuring time, depth, growth and development of a beetle...

Annotated diagram measuring time, depth, growth and development of a beetle...

 Andreas Fischer's A Week in the Life.

Andreas Fischer's A Week in the Life.

   
  
 
  
    
  
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   In  Envisioning Information  Edward Tufte describes micro/macro narratives. These narratives are actually small, detailed stories that make up larger coherent stories. “Simplicity of reading,” he writes, “derives from the context of detailed and complex information, properly arranged.” He goes on to describe the rich interface to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington that is largely dependent on the chronological rather than the alphabetic listing of the names of 58, 000 dead soldiers. Jan Scruggs and Joel Swerdlow write in  To Heal a Nation , that “chronological listing was essential to designer Maya Lin’s vision for the memorial. War veterans would find their story told, and their friends remembered, in the panel that corresponded to their tour of duty…. Locating names would be like finding bodies on a battlefield.” And when names are found, after walking downward into the memorial’s slight grade, visitors see their own living reflections and the names of the soldiers in the etched polished black granite.

In Envisioning Information Edward Tufte describes micro/macro narratives. These narratives are actually small, detailed stories that make up larger coherent stories. “Simplicity of reading,” he writes, “derives from the context of detailed and complex information, properly arranged.” He goes on to describe the rich interface to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington that is largely dependent on the chronological rather than the alphabetic listing of the names of 58, 000 dead soldiers. Jan Scruggs and Joel Swerdlow write in To Heal a Nation, that “chronological listing was essential to designer Maya Lin’s vision for the memorial. War veterans would find their story told, and their friends remembered, in the panel that corresponded to their tour of duty…. Locating names would be like finding bodies on a battlefield.” And when names are found, after walking downward into the memorial’s slight grade, visitors see their own living reflections and the names of the soldiers in the etched polished black granite.

Kaitlin Pollock's forensic autobiographical data presentation:

 

Frank Mouris' Oscar winning animated short is an example of an associational autobiography: